How can you prioritize your team’s time and resources to decide how to cultivate major gifts and prioritize gift requests?

Almost every cause and organization is facing increased philanthropic need this year. When combined with the reality that discovery visits and in-person cultivation, briefing, solicitation, and stewardship will likely be limited for many more months, deepening your existing relationships becomes an even higher priority in the current environment. It is critical to take the time to examine and analyze your data so that you can identify your best prospects to upgrade and prioritize engagement activity with those who are most likely to support you now.

To achieve year-end goals, sharpen your focus on those who have the greatest capacity to give and are already your friends. Make sure you are working with your top and most obvious donors when prioritizing your valuable time. While a seven-figure prospect who has not responded to repeated outreach may still be a long-term relationship to pursue for lots of reasons, a consistent five-figure donor who is not yet giving at maximum capacity is likely a better focus for a virtual briefing that underscores the critical need your organization faces right now to secure a major gift in the next 100 days.

Fortunately, data can inform how to segment donors into short, medium and long-term focus. Examining the intersection between Recency, Frequency, Monetary Value (“RFM”) and wealth screening is the simplest way to start narrowing your prospect pool to focus on those who are both closest to you and have capacity. When those very basic results are combined with relationship mapping and engagement analysis, they form the foundation of a strong plan to increase major gifts.

RFM: What is it and why would we do it?

A Recency, Frequency, Monetary Value (“RFM”) analysis is the scoring of current donors to rank and prioritize your database through three attributes: recency, frequency, and volume of giving. It can help you answer many questions, including: Who has given recently and is with you right now? Who has given over time and demonstrated loyalty to your cause? Who are your top lifetime givers?

Questions to Answer

Before getting started on your analysis, you’ll want to ask yourself the following questions:

  • Would I like to measure total lifetime giving or total giving within the past certain number of years (e.g. the last 10 years)? This will inform how you set up your RFM key, described in the guide.
  • Do I have enough information about each donor to complete the analysis? You will need name, database ID, the date of their last gift, the number of times that they have given (lifetime or within the time frame you decided), and the amount of their giving (lifetime or within the time frame you decided). 
  • Who will I use to screen my data? There are many vendors; which one you use is less important than knowing that you are aiming to focus on those closest to you with identified capacity and knowing that using publicly available data is one helpful tool to inform that decision.

How to Perform an RFM Analysis

You have followed along and may be wondering, how exactly does one perform an RFM analysis? Jessica Roberts, Director of Data Insights and Client Engagements at CCS, can help! Jessica has used advanced analytics to advance nonprofit fundraising for over 15 years and has put together a step-by-step guide here: How to Perform an RFM Analysis. For questions about the process or donor analytics more broadly, contact Jessica and CCS’s Data Analytics Team at analytics@ccsfundraising.com.

Wealth Screening: Another Tool in the Quiver

There are many vendors who can screen your data for pennies per name, and many organizations already have access to screening built-in through database subscriptions. While wealth screening is not perfect (every screening turns up a million-dollar donor with low identified giving capacity), it can be very directionally important. The consistent $1,000 donor who gave last year with a capacity to give $1M+ that you never thought about is one ideal outcome of this exercise.

Other Recommendations

  • Whether you have 50 front-line fundraisers or are a one-person show, there is some number of people that you can realistically connect with in the next hundred days. Determine your unique number, and create filters in an excel spreadsheet that contains your RFM and wealth screening results to exclude lower capacity and lower RFM scores until you get there.
  • We have found that the most robust results of an RFM analysis occur when they are used to inform community engagement and donor request plans.
  • Having clean data is important. Performing an RFM analysis could be an excellent opportunity to organize and update your data to maximize the accuracy of your results.
  • Harness the power of your data by asking yourself “What do I want to know about donor behavior?” Your questions can likely be answered by increasing data gathering and exploring advanced tools for data-driven fundraising solutions.

How can we help you?

CCS offers an array of Data Analytics services to help nonprofit organizations reach their full fundraising potential.

While we welcome registrants to this webinar worldwide, please note that it is hosted in British Standard Time and geared towards a European audience.

We will be joined by Laura Boardman, Managing Director, Development & Outreach at Human Rights Watch in Europe. As Human Rights Watch continues to raise funds to defend the rights of people across the world, Laura will discuss how they ensure that confidence and offer practical advice for donor engagement.

The session is designed to be helpful to all nonprofit professionals regardless of sector, location, or scale of your fundraising operations.

Today, many nonprofit organizations round out their annual and major gift efforts with programs focused on planned giving. Implementing a planned giving program can be an effective way to diversify revenue streams and move donors along a continuum of commitment to your organization similar to the one shown below.

Recently, CCS partnered with Holocaust Museum LA (HMLA) to design a planned giving program that will be rolled out to a select cross-section of donors in the near future. HMLA felt it both important and relevant to increase emphasis on planned giving, particularly because the concept of honoring legacy is a central theme in their mission to “commemorate those who perished, honor those who survived, educate about the Holocaust, and inspire a more dignified and humane world.” Holocaust Museum LA CEO, Beth Kean, said, “With an aging community of survivors, we had long wanted to create a proactive planned giving program to offer families opportunities to make an enduring, meaningful gift that will impact future generations. We just didn’t know where to get started. After CCS helped us launch a successful capital campaign, we knew their team of strategic fundraising experts would be the perfect partner to guide us on a legacy program.”

Many of the volunteers at the heart of the Museum’s programming are Holocaust survivors now in their 90’s. Others have parents, grandparents, or other family members who escaped or perished during the Holocaust. Couple this history with statistics on the alarming increase of hate crimes and extremism in our society today, and the need for HMLA’s work to endure is evident. A successful planned giving program provides a unique opportunity to quickly scale an organization’s endowment as well as meet more immediate cash needs. At HMLA, such a program will help ensure that the Museum’s vital work continues in perpetuity.

In order to develop a planned giving program tailored to the Museum, CCS conducted a gift planning assessment and first sought to understand the attitudes about and proficiency with planned giving that exist within HMLA’s universe of donors. HMLA’s unique legacy-focused culture combined with the Jewish concepts of tzedakah and tikkun olam – moral obligation to give charitably and to repair the world – suggested that such a program would flourish at the Museum; however, it was important to see this intuition confirmed by data. Thus, we worked with HMLA to isolate a strong set of planned giving prospects and invited them to participate in a survey that gathered qualitative and quantitative data related to donor satisfaction, engagement, and interest in planned giving. What we learned about this community was encouraging and provided us with the basis for developing the materials, events, and messaging that now compose HMLA’s planned giving program.

The program was designed to start small and eventually grow into a more robust operation as HMLA expands its staff and expertise with various gift planning vehicles. Initial focus was placed on developing the following materials:

  • Prospect matrix – This database grew out of the planned giving survey, wealth screening analysis, and other data analytics work. A significant list of potential planned giving donors was created and then prioritized for cultivation. Strategic outreach activities were designed to correspond with various prospect groups. For example, a follow-up email was designed to announce the planned giving society, and multiple versions were created with text befitting survey participants, current planned giving donors, or those in the survivor community.
  • Preliminary brochure – A brochure featuring donor testimonials was designed for digital and print use to introduce the planned giving program. The brochure includes a QR code and website URL that enable donors to sign up to learn more about the program. A separate list of planned giving vehicles and their benefits was developed to accompany the physical brochure and serve as a donor takeaway at meetings and events.
  • Recognition and benefits – CCS worked with the Museum team to conceptualize Enduring Truth, a legacy society for planned giving donors. Benefits of membership include special listings and the chance to participate in legacy society luncheons, planned giving seminars, and planned giving salon events. CCS also reviewed and updated HMLA’s gift acceptance policies to adhere to current standards and support a greater organizational focus on planned giving.
  • Planning calendar – An annual calendar of planned giving communications and events was created to ensure that donors at various stages in the pipeline are being cultivated and stewarded at an optimal cadence.
  • Branding and messaging development – A concept note for a digital planned giving newsletter was developed to welcome new legacy donors, celebrate milestones, provide advice from featured financial experts, and spotlight events and exhibits at the Museum.
  • List of experts – A list of financial planners, CPAs, estate attorneys, and other experts was compiled. During the course of the project, many of the individuals listed were engaged to review materials and plans and provide feedback to the Museum. In the future, these individuals may be featured in the newsletter or invited to speak at seminars and other planned giving-focused events.

Creating the simple tools above as well as the talking points and communications plan to introduce them to potential donors were foundational steps in crafting what will undoubtedly be a strong planned giving program at Holocaust Museum LA. CCS looks forward to our continued partnership with HMLA as they embark on implementing and growing their planned giving program for the benefit of their donors and mission.

If you have questions about exploring gift planning work at your organization, please contact info@ccsfundraising.com.

A graphic of the Giving USA 2022

In this session, we hear from Dr. Una Osili, Associate Dean for Research and International Programs at the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, who leads the research and production of Giving USA, a publication of the Giving USA Foundation. Dr. Osili presents trends from the latest report, which features a look back at charitable giving in 2021.

Following the presentation, panelists dive into a discussion on the significance and implications of this year’s numbers.

PRESENTED BY

Kara Ramirez Mullins

Kara Ramirez Mullins

Chief Advancement Officer

National Geographic Society
Lisa Wallack

Lisa Wallack

Vice Chair, International Board of Directors

Juvenile Diabetes Research Foundation (JDRF)
Dr. Anna Pruitt

Dr. Anna Pruitt

Managing Editor, Giving USA

IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
Dr. Una Osili

Dr. Una Osili

Associate Dean for Research and International Programs; Dean’s Fellow, Mays Family Institute on Diverse Philanthropy

IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
Sarah Krasin

Sarah Krasin

Managing Director

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Publication

Philanthropic Landscape Report, 11th Edition

Featuring essential philanthropic research from all major sources in the industry, this exclusive report will examine key themes in American philanthropy and the latest data on giving by U.S. individuals, foundations, and corporations.

July 20, 2021
Event

Perspectives on Philanthropy — Giving USA 2022

Join the discussion about philanthropic trends revealed by the Giving USA 2022 report by registering for any of our upcoming events.

Thursday, July 14, 2022

Want to start a conversation?

We’d love to help you plan your next chapter!

PRESENTED BY

Robyn Deutsch

Robyn Deutsch

Senior Director

Leah Heister Burton

Leah Heister Burton

Deputy Director and Chief Advancement Officer

The Guggenheim
Karie Burch

Karie Burch

Director of Development

Portland Arts Museum
Nicole Stratton

Nicole Stratton

Vice President

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June 29, 2022
Article

Meeting the Moment: A Case Study on Building a Successful Planned Giving Program for an Arts & Culture Institution in the Jewish Sector

CCS’s partnership with Holocaust Museum LA (HMLA) serves as a helpful example of how to design an effective planned giving program.

June 24, 2022

Want to start a conversation?

We’d love to help you plan your next chapter!

Perspectives on Philanthropy - Giving USA 2022 next to a graphic of the publication.

Official Report Release & Webinar with the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy
ORIGINAL BROADCAST: Tuesday, June 21, 2022

In this session, we heard from Dr. Una Osili, Associate Dean for Research and International Programs at the IU Lilly Family School of Philanthropy, who leads the research and production of Giving USA, a publication of the Giving USA Foundation. Dr. Osili presented trends from the latest report, which features a look back at charitable giving in 2021. Panelists also dove into a discussion on the significance and implications of this year’s numbers.

Join us in a city near you! View our in-person regional 2022 Giving USA events below.

southEast US EVENTS

2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: Charlotte (In Partnership With AFP Charlotte)
Thursday, July 14 | 8:30am ET | Goodwill Industries Of The Southern Piedmont
Learn More & Register Here
2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: Miami
Friday, September 16 | Time TBD | Location TBD
More details coming soon
2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: Washington, DC
Friday, September 23 (tentative) | Time TBD | Howard University
More details coming soon

southWEST US EVENTS

2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: Orange County (In Partnership With AFP Orange County)
Tuesday, July 19 | 10:30am PT | City National Grove of Anaheim
*Additional registration fee required
Learn More & Register Here

northEast US EVENTS

[CONCLUDED] 2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: New Jersey (In Partnership With AFP New Jersey)
Wednesday, June 22 | Noon ET | Seton Hall University
[CONCLUDED] 2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: Philadelphia
Friday, June 24 | 8:30am ET | The Franklin Institute
[CONCLUDED] 2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: New York City
Tuesday, June 28 | 8am ET | New York City Bar Association
[CONCLUDED] 2022 Giving USA Philanthropy Forum: Pittsburgh
Tuesday, June 28 | 8:30am ET | Phipps Conservatory & Botanical Gardens

Join the conversation with us!

Use #CCSGivingUSA before, during, and after the events.

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Philanthropic Landscape Report, 11th Edition

Featuring essential philanthropic research from all major sources in the industry, this exclusive report will examine key themes in American philanthropy and the latest data on giving by U.S. individuals, foundations, and corporations.

July 20, 2021
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CCS Philanthropy Pulse

The CCS Philanthropy Pulse survey report provides a window into the fundraising practices of almost 900 organizations based on data collected in late 2021. Check out both our main report and sector-specific spotlights for Arts & Culture, Health, Higher Education, Human Services, Independent Schools, and Religion.

January 25, 2022

In 2016, Michael Waldman, the visionary CEO of St. Paul JCC, sought CCS Fundraising out as a partner when the fundraising slowed on their Capital Campaign. The multi-million-dollar campaign was initiated to reimagine spaces, including a state-of-the-art performing arts center, aquatic center, fitness facilities, and a cultural arts wing. Together, the JCC and CCS created a plan to move the needle upwards from $7 million. By the end of 2017, more gifts were secured than imaginable, reaching $15 million. By the end of 2018, the total surpassed $16 million and membership had grown by 600 families. Today, the JCC is stronger than ever, having merged with another local JCC to form the Minnesota JCC with Michael at the helm. Brooke Laskin, Vice President at CCS, caught up with Michael Waldman to reflect on their partnership, Michael’s leadership, and the role of Jewish values in philanthropy.

Brooke: Can you believe it’s been more than five years since we worked shoulder-to-shoulder?

Michael: It’s flown by and the last pledges are being paid this year. We were fortunate that more than 99% of the funds pledged came to fruition!

Brooke: What an impressive rate of return. What do you credit it to?

Michael: Our donors, our friends, our community, our Jewish values. We are fortunate.

A child enjoys swimming at the JCC.

Brooke: Let’s talk a little about Jewish values. Like many, I learned how to swim at a JCC as a preschooler, but I also learned about the Jewish values of tzedakah (giving back) and tikkun olam (repairing the world) as a JCC preschooler.

Michael: These values are all about philanthropy – making the world a better place and doing acts of charity. We teach this early on at our early childhood centers, two camps (Butwin and Olami), and through our youth programming. What’s unique about the JCC is that we are guided by Jewish values and our campers and preschoolers are both Jewish and non-Jewish. We program through a Jewish lens, and create accessible ways for our youth to experience the act of giving on a local level to help them see what is right in front of them and then help them connect what they learn to a more global perspective. For example, why is it important to give to food banks? We didn’t just do a canned food drive to reach a goal and have pizza party– we did it because someone is going to eat those canned goods who otherwise may go hungry tonight. It’s important for kids in our community, who may never know what it is like to be hungry, to understand early on how to be better citizens of our community and world. While these are Jewish values, they are ultimately human values that relate to us all.

Brooke: Tell me a little about how you carry out these values in your own home and how they have been passed down from one generation to the next.

Michael: I looked at what my grandparents and parents instilled in family about giving back. While they didn’t have a lot of money, they still gave financially and through gifts of time. Today, my parents talk to my own two sons and their other grandchildren about giving annually. They tell each grandkid to research a nonprofit and they donate to the places the kids recommend. The giving has shifted from the zoo, to homeless shelters, to Alzheimer’s research, to cleaning up the ocean – whatever is on their minds as they grow up. It’s more than a teaching moment – it’s never been a question of why philanthropy is important because it is so ingrained.

A group of adults take part in a Zumba class at the St. Paul JCC.

Brooke: A passion for fundraising runs in your family!

Michael: My father was a social worker and, as he took on the role of an agency executive in the 1980s, that came with the role of fundraising.  He started a comedy event at Jewish Family and Children’s Services to raise money, which was novel at the time. Today he is 81 and has retired three times. He keeps restarting at places to fundraise and is now helping a local Jewish overnight camp. He loves it and I am inspired by him.

Brooke: The JCC has persevered through a lot as a result of COVID. How have you adapted and grown as an organization?

Michael: We saw a growth in annual giving as a result of COVID. There was recognition of what the JCC means to people who are marginalized, such as those with disabilities or the elderly. Without the JCC, many were isolated from the community with no connections other than our staff that did outreach. For example, we adapted our programming so that, rather than having people come to the JCC for their meals, we delivered it right to them and created a kosher drive-through. On the fundraising side, we would never have asked people for money by Zoom before COVID, but now we find we can connect with more people more often using technology, and that is a good thing. That said, it’s still not the same as sitting at the table with someone or catching up in the parking lot after a board meeting. But we have found meaningful ways to continue to move relationships forward.

Fast forward to now, we had a $1.5 million deficit this year because we’ve dropped a main source of revenue as a result of the pandemic – membership. People weren’t coming in person. Less members means less classes, less campers, less personal training, and more. We dropped from 3,700 membership units to 1,400 during the pandemic and are now back up to 2,700. We set up the Gesher Initiative to bridge the difference. Gesher means “bridge” in Hebrew. Generous people who understand that the JCC must get through this are stepping up.

Brooke: How did combining with another JCC during COVID play into this all?

Michael: We had been exploring a combination effort ahead of the pandemic and we had a strong theory that combining would have both a positive programmatic and financial impact. Obviously, no one knew COVID was coming, but our hypothesis proved to be accurate—when resources got tight, we found important opportunities to be more efficient together. Significant planning and work by dedicated leaders had occurred ahead of the pandemic, and we were fortunate that the timing lined up.

Brooke: Any advice to other organizations considering merging?

Michael: Start with an open mind. Start by saying, “We think there might be value in combining. Let’s see if this is true.” It is critical to weigh all information and not solely focus on the financial aspect. The first step was asking, “Should we merge?” Then the next step was, “How?” We explored many different options and structures. In the end, we wound up forming two new entities—an operating JCC and a separate foundation that holds our endowments and real estate assets.

Kids in a JCC program smile for a group picture in their life jackets.

Brooke: It’s been awhile since I worked on your case for support. What’s your latest pitch?

Michael: Just as it’s always been—we change lives in ways large and small. We’re more than a place to exercise—we are a community. The purpose of the case is to help people understand that it’s all about what we do with revenue—through summer camping; early childhood education; supportive services; Jewish art, culture and enrichment; and of course, health and wellness, we ignite the human spirit and transform lives every day in ways big and small. We invest your money back into the community through scholarships, meal programs, programs for people with disabilities, and more. Everything we do is interfaith and welcoming to all that share our value of inclusion, and everything we do is done through the lens of Jewish values and culture. What other organization fights antisemitism by bringing people of all faiths together to have fun?

Brooke: I’m a JCC champion and I hope my annual fund gift, combined with other friends, will help the J persist for generations to come. Thanks for catching up, Michael.  

This interview was adapted and edited for online article format.

More Insights

Publication

Philanthropic Landscape Report, 11th Edition

Featuring essential philanthropic research from all major sources in the industry, this exclusive report will examine key themes in American philanthropy and the latest data on giving by U.S. individuals, foundations, and corporations.

July 20, 2021
Publication

CCS Philanthropy Pulse

The CCS Philanthropy Pulse survey report provides a window into the fundraising practices of almost 900 organizations based on data collected in late 2021. Check out both our main report and sector-specific spotlights for Arts & Culture, Health, Higher Education, Human Services, Independent Schools, and Religion.

January 25, 2022

New York, NY (May 23, 2022) CCS Fundraising announced today that it has received an investment from Abry Partners to accelerate the company’s rapid growth. Terms of the investment were not disclosed.

Headquartered in New York, with offices around the globe, CCS Fundraising is the world’s leading fundraising consulting firm. For 75 years, CCS Fundraising has empowered nonprofit organizations across all sectors in their efforts to advance critical causes. As a firm of experts in fundraising campaigns and philanthropic strategy, CCS plans and implements initiatives that help nonprofit organizations strengthen their impact locally, nationally, and globally.

“This partnership will allow CCS to enhance all aspects of our business – from growing the impact we have on every client to strengthening the professional home we build for our employees,” said Jon Kane, CEO of CCS Fundraising. “This investment means we can think expansively about our work and how we best serve clients, including investing more aggressively in technology and data analytics, pursuing new markets, and building stronger talent management and professional services capabilities. We are incredibly proud of the depth and breadth of the work that CCS has accomplished over the last 75 years. This investment is a testament to the caliber of that work and will help us to build on that track record in the years and decades to come.”

“At CCS, our clients are central to our mission and ethos. We exist to ensure they are able to continue advancing their work – whether that’s enhancing higher education, ensuring excellent healthcare, preserving arts and cultural institutions, strengthening faith-based organizations, or beyond,” said Rick Happy, Chairman of CCS Fundraising. “This investment gives us additional tools and resources to continue to provide our clients with exceptional services and bolsters our ability to continue hiring best-in-class professionals committed to delivering transformational change for nonprofits.”

“We are excited to partner with the market leader in the not-for-profit fundraising services sector,” said Tyler Wick, Partner at Abry Partners. “The Company’s established client base of leading global nonprofits, universities and health systems is a testament to the skill with which CCS delivers its mission-critical services. We look forward to working closely with management to help build value in this next leg of the journey.”

William Blair & Company served as financial advisor and Shearman & Sterling LLP served as legal advisor to CCS Fundraising. BrightTower served as financial advisor and Kirkland & Ellis LLP served as legal advisor to Abry Partners.


About CCS Fundraising 

CCS Fundraising is a strategic consulting firm that has partnered with nonprofits for transformational change for 75 years. CCS Fundraising provides a wide range of services that support and strengthen nonprofit fundraising programs, including campaign management, strategic planning, data analytics, and major gift strategy. The firm’s experts, skilled in campaign and development strategy, work closely with organizations of all sizes across nonprofit sectors and geographies. For more information on CCS Fundraising, please visit www.ccsfundraising.com.

About Abry Partners 

Abry is one of the most experienced and successful sector-focused private equity investment firms in North America. Since its founding in 1989, the firm has completed over $90 billion of leveraged transactions and other private equity or preferred equity placements. Currently, the firm manages over $5 billion of capital across its active funds. For more information on Abry, please visit www.abry.com.

New York, NY (May 22, 2022) – Today, CCS Fundraising, the world’s leading fundraising consulting firm, announced a series of transitions within its Executive Leadership Team.

The firm announced the retirement of outgoing Chairman Bob Kissane who has been crucial to the success of innumerable philanthropic and development projects for over 40 years. Bob will continue to support CCS and its clients in an advisory capacity for the foreseeable future.

Rick Happy will become Chairman of CCS Fundraising. Rick has been with the firm for over three decades and has established himself as a philanthropic leader in the U.S. and abroad. Rick will continue to lead the firm’s work throughout the Western United States.

“I want to thank Bob for his incredible service to the firm for over 40 years, and his pivotal role in its strategic evolution over that period. I wish him a happy and well-deserved retirement,” said Rick Happy, incoming CCS Chairman. “These last three decades, it has been an honor to serve our incredible clients and I’m looking forward to continuing that work as well as the exciting challenges ahead in my added capacity as Chairman.

Jon Kane, who has served as President of CCS since 2016, will become President & CEO. Jon Kane brings over 25 years of expertise in business, management, and strategic consulting, and deep pride in CCS’ work and commitment to its clients to his new role.

Tom Kissane and Robert (“Bo”) Rice, Principal & Managing Directors with over 30 years each with CCS, and leaders in the sector, are taking on the additional title of Vice-Chairmen.

The firm also announced the elevation of Sarah Krasin and Edward Van Saders to the role of Partner. Sarah leads the firm’s Boston office and has been instrumental in growing CCS’ presence and client partnerships across the New England region. Edward Van Saders is the firm’s Chief Financial Officer and has over 30 years of leadership experience. Sarah and Edward join a partnership comprised of 25 leaders in the philanthropic sector.

“I’m delighted to welcome Sarah Krasin and Edward Van Saders to our esteemed group of CCS partners, and to be expanding our leadership team overall,” said Jon Kane, CEO & President. “Both Sarah and Edward have been instrumental in the firm’s development, and their expertise and immense knowledge of the nonprofit sector will continue to be incredible assets as we look toward the firm’s growth in the future.”


About CCS Fundraising

CCS Fundraising is a strategic consulting firm that has partnered with nonprofits for transformational change for 75 years. CCS Fundraising provides a wide range of services that support and strengthen nonprofit fundraising programs, including campaign management, strategic planning, data analytics, and major gift strategy. The firm’s experts, skilled in campaign and development strategy, work closely with organizations of all sizes across nonprofit sectors and geographies.

PRESENTED BY

Aashika Patel

Aashika Patel

Senior Vice President

Ian Swedish

Ian Swedish

Senior Vice President

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RFM and Wealth Screening for Major Gift Strategy

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June 29, 2022
Article

Meeting the Moment: A Case Study on Building a Successful Planned Giving Program for an Arts & Culture Institution in the Jewish Sector

CCS’s partnership with Holocaust Museum LA (HMLA) serves as a helpful example of how to design an effective planned giving program.

June 24, 2022

Want to start a conversation?

We’d love to help you plan your next chapter!